Multifocal Contact Lenses

Drs. Vance & Stovall offer Louisville a wide selection of Multi-Focal Contact Lenses.

In both soft and GP designs, multifocal lenses offer patients both distance and near vision correction just like a pair of bifocal glasses!

Bifocal and multifocal contact lenses work in several different ways, depending on the design of the lens. The designs fall into two basic groups:

  1. “Alternating vision” (translating) lenses are so named because your pupil alternates between the two powers, as your gaze shifts upward or downward.
  2. “Simultaneous vision” lenses require your eye to be looking through both distance and near powers at the same time. Although this might sound unworkable, your visual system learns to select the correct power choice depending on how close or far you’re trying to see.

Which Bifocal Contact Lens is Right for Me?

Two factors that Drs. Vance & Stovall will consider in choosing a bifocal contact lens are pupil size and your “add,” or near prescription.

There are no hard and fast rules. But in general, low adds are better suited to an aspheric multifocal. Alternating vision, accomplished with a translating bifocal, is a better choice for high adds. Too large a pupil can be problematic for an aspheric multifocal lens.

You may need to try different bifocal contact lens designs before finding the one that’s right for you.

Visit Drs. Vance & Stovall to determine if bifocal contact lenses make sense for your needs and to identify the best lens for you.

Drs. Vance & Stovall feature a wide selection of name brand contact lenses including:

Drs. Vance & Stovall offer Louisville a wide selection of Multi-Focal Contact Lenses.

In both soft and GP designs, multifocal lenses offer patients both distance and near vision correction just like a pair of bifocal glasses!

Bifocal and multifocal contact lenses work in several different ways, depending on the design of the lens. The designs fall into two basic groups:

  1. “Alternating vision” (translating) lenses are so named because your pupil alternates between the two powers, as your gaze shifts upward or downward.
  2. “Simultaneous vision” lenses require your eye to be looking through both distance and near powers at the same time. Although this might sound unworkable, your visual system learns to select the correct power choice depending on how close or far you’re trying to see.

Which Bifocal Contact Lens is Right for Me?

Two factors that Drs. Vance & Stovall will consider in choosing a bifocal contact lens are pupil size and your “add,” or near prescription.

There are no hard and fast rules. But in general, low adds are better suited to an aspheric multifocal. Alternating vision, accomplished with a translating bifocal, is a better choice for high adds. Too large a pupil can be problematic for an aspheric multifocal lens.

You may need to try different bifocal contact lens designs before finding the one that’s right for you.

Visit Drs. Vance & Stovall to determine if bifocal contact lenses make sense for your needs and to identify the best lens for you.

Drs. Vance & Stovall feature a wide selection of name brand contact lenses including: